What does a pupil guide do?

Find out what a pupil guide does, and why the role is so important as well as how you can find work in this role near you.

What is a pupil guide?

“Bus” in Makaton

A pupil guide is a person who accompanies children with SEND (special educational needs and disabilities) on their way to and from school on transport supplied by the local authority.

What do you need to be a pupil guide?

Reliability – SEND children can often be very sensitive to changes to their routine, so pupil guides should be people who can commit to the role on a regular basis.

 

A supportive nature – when children find the transition from home to school difficult, they may become upset or need additional support during the journey. This is where you can really shine as a pupil guide. Your role isn’t to simply sit on a bus and keep an eye on the children, you’ll need to speak to them in a calm and friendly manner, and help to ease the transition to and from school.

 

Knowledge of SEND – you don’t need to be an expert in SEND, but some knowledge or experience of working with individuals who have special educational needs or disabilities would be helpful.

 

Non-verbal communication skills – some children with SEND may struggle to communicate verbally. Therefore, if you know some Makaton or PECs, this could be very helpful. You don’t need to be fluent, but a few useful phrases could come in very handy! (We run an introduction to non-verbal communication course, so can help you with this!)

 

Good general communication skills – you’ll act as a vital link to parents on their child’s health, wellbeing, welfare and education, so good communication skills and a relatively confident personality are very useful in this role.

What are the hours?

You will usually be working between 7-10 am and 2.30-5.30 pm, which means the role could fit around other commitments and is great for those who can only do a few hours work per day.

How can I get a job as a pupil guide?

At Axcis, we work closely with local authorities to provide SEND teaching and support staff, so by registering with us, you’ll have access to our latest vacancies, which include roles as pupil guides. However, if you’d like to chat with your local consultant first to find out more, why not get in touch with your nearest Axcis office today and find out how we can help you with your search for work?

Become a Vetting Administrator with Axcis.

Are you working in a call centre, or in a busy admin role and seeking a new challenge? Have you thought about becoming a vetting administrator? Find out all about the role, and how it might suit you here!

What does a vetting administrator do?

In a nutshell, our vetting administrators perform background and document checks for our candidates before they can go out to work for Axcis. This includes things like:

 

You’ll need to be confident on the phone to work as a Vetting Administrator for Axcis

  • Meeting and greeting candidates
  • Sending off, and following up reference requests
  • Doing criminal records checks (DBS)
  • Processing List 99 checks
  • Checking documents such as qualifications and proof of ID
  • Answering phones/call screening
  • And lots more! This can be quite a varied role at times!

What skills does a vetter need?

Chasing up paperwork for one candidate is straight forward enough, but when you have a list of 100 candidates to work through, time management starts to become a really important skill. You need to be able to prioritise your workload and ensure that the most pressing candidates are dealt with first (don’t worry, we have systems to help you with this!) You’ll also be on the phone a lot, so being confident making and receiving calls is crucial in this role. And of course, attention to detail is of the utmost importance, too as we can’t have staff going out to schools without the correct compliance in place first. This means you need to have an eye for detail and a meticulous nature to succeed in this role. Again, we have excellent systems in place for double-checking all candidates, but the more we can clear quickly and efficiently, the better!

What do other vetters say about the role?

It’s busy! We are on the phones a lot and often have consultants asking us to clear people as a priority so that they can go out to work. If we don’t do our jobs well, people miss out on jobs, and we don’t want that to happen so we really need to be on the ball. However, the vetting team has an excellent manager and the system and processes at Axcis really help us to be able to perform our jobs well. I like my role as a vetting administrator, and I’m really glad I found Axcis!

Why work for Axcis?

Axcis is the foremost supplier of SEND staff to mainstream schools and alternative provisions in England and Wales. With close ties to both the National Autistic Society and the National Association of Special Educational Needs, we take our responsibility to the sector seriously. You’ll be working for a company with an established reputation as a market leader in their field. We have an excellent management team to train and support you and offer additional incentives such as reduced hours during the school summer holidays, prizes and rewards. We pay competitive rates of pay and value the staff who work for us. So, if you’re looking fo ra change in career, why not send a CV to sara@axcis.co.uk, our HR Executive, or check out our internal vacancies page today?

Is labelling children unavoidable to get them the help they need and deserve? (Guest post)

Graham Chatterley

Graham Chatterley is an assistant head at a school in Warrington for pupils with a range of SEMH needs. He has 4 children, the youngest 2 of which have varying ASD needs. One being very high functioning with some social and understanding difficulties, however managing well in Mainstream Primary. The other having significant ASD, ADHD and Sensory Processing Disorder needs requiring an SLD setting. This has put Graham in an unusual position of experiencing both sides of Special Education Needs which has aided his understandings of both. He has kindly provided this guest post for the Axcis blog.

 

Is labelling children unavoidable to get them the help they need and deserve?

I was at a conference the other day where the speaker, who was coming from a professional psychologist point of view, was talking about how we shouldn’t label children with additional needs.

 

In principle I absolutely agree with his theory, a child is an individual who might have additional needs. They are not an ASD child or an ADHD child as I often hear them referred to as. This implies that if they have these needs they are all the same. I don’t want to go into spectrums but attempting to treat them all the same because they share a need is narrow-minded and unfair. Yes, there may be some generic traits and strategies that work for the majority but we should not presume to know them because they have a common difficulty. You wouldn’t step into a room of wheelchair users and expect them to have the same interests, behaviours and personalities, though often this is the case with something like autism.

 

Awareness of these additional needs is improving – and this is a good thing. Unfortunately, if one is lucky enough to get a diagnosis, it will often come with a label. However should we not give children the diagnosis they need because it might cause people to make assumptions about them? This can, indeed be a dilemma. However not recognising a difficulty is far more damaging in my opinion than any label.

Experience outweighs all the theory in the world

So let’s get the diagnosis, keep the labels and educate practitioners further on these conditions. The difficulty with this is that these are invisible conditions laced with inconsistencies and surrounded by misconceptions. The spectrums for ASD and ADHD are so vast that all the theory training in the world isn’t going to be enough. It is only from experience, in depth knowledge of the child and trial and error that real progress is made.

 

It is an enlightening experience to get into a two hour argument with a child with high functioning autism who has got a detention for appearing to be oppositional and refusing to follow instructions. However when you get to the bottom of it, the reality is that they have misunderstood what was asked of them initially, repeatedly questioned the teacher and then afterwards were desperately trying to explain themselves because they don’t want you to think bad of them. These experiences are what help you to learn to meet these children’s needs.

 

Assuming to know because you’ve had the theory training or taught one before when faced with children with these needs is a dangerous road to go down. As a parent of an autistic child, there is little more annoying than hearing a phrase like ‘My sisters boyfriends neighbour has an autistic kid, so I know all about that!’ No you don’t! You may know something about the other child albeit very little but you have never met my child and hence know nothing about them. What works for someone else is not necessarily going to work for my child.

 

The only way we can truly be effective is to have an open mind and treat each child as an individual regardless of their label or their need. Yes, there may be common traits and strategies that have been effective and it would be crazy to dismiss them. Just don’t hang your hat on them!

 

It’s about trying to get into and understand the mindset of the child and moving away from the idea that their thinking is wrong. It’s not wrong, it’s different! Over time, many of these children will learn the best way to fit their needs into the expectations of society, but until they can do this we as parents and educators must move our mindset to meet them.

Getting support

Being understood by the people who play pivotal roles at home and education is the most important thing. Children with additional needs will require, and should receive the support they deserve from outside agencies. Again, as both a parent and an assistant head, I have gained first-hand experience of just how hard it can be to obtain this support.

 

Quite often, systems get in the way – and if a parent doesn’t know how to play the game, it can be incredibly hard. Help will not be forthcoming without begging for it. It is only because my wife was so quick to identify our son Daniel’s needs and I have knowledge of the systems, that we were able to get him an early diagnosis and into a specialist nursery. Without these things he would have been sent to a mainstream nursery where everyone would have been unsafe and it would have been his first major “failure”. Sadly this is the way the system works, children have to fail before anything happens. Even then, without a diagnosis you cannot get help and support from services, but you can’t get the diagnosis without help and support from services. Go figure!

 

A parent or school will often try to be pre-emptive about supporting a child who they suspect has SEND, but will be faced with crazy waiting lists or fobbed off. Even when you have a diagnosis and have a referral to CAMHs or Occupational Therapy etc. you still need to fight tooth and nail for help from them, and without a diagnosis there is even less chance. Convoluted systems and an inability to meet demand makes everything a battle for the parents of SEND children.

 

In my experience, it often reaches a point when parents are exhausted because their child isn’t sleeping well, or they are injured and embarrassed because their child has become violent and lashed out through frustration; head-butting them and causing a black eye, for example. Or they are isolated because they won’t leave the house for fear of the looks and comments they get from people for having a child who is different and making strange noises, having meltdowns or trying to run off. Often, relationships between parents suffer as a result of these situations, making it even harder for the family as a whole to function.

 

When this is your day to day and then you still have to fight for every ounce of support you are entitled to it can become an overwhelming and impossible task. And if a parent is doing the amazing job of managing these things and still coping then chances are they will NOT be offered support, because they don’t appear to need it!

 

This is a massive flaw in the system – everything is reactive and efforts are made to repair things after they have reached breaking point instead of being proactive and supporting early. It can be likened to not treating an illness, and instead waiting for organs to fail, performing surgery and having to do years of intense rehab. Conversely, treating the illness early and performing regular check-ups would have been more effective, as well as cheaper for everyone! Every professional from every service I speak to knows that it is much easier to intervene and help early than to try to repair a situation that has hit crisis point, but they find themselves blocked by systems that are outdated and ineffective.

 

It’s the same in terms of education. I’ve been to meetings with the aim of getting appropriate support for my child. This has involved sitting with his class teacher and describing all the worst things about him in order to convince a stranger that he needs additional funding. We cannot mention the amazing qualities and personality he has or the enormous progress he has made with his limited communication and social skills. We have to focus on how dangerous and violent he can be and that he can’t talk or isn’t toilet trained. It’s a heart-breaking position for a parent in that you have to paint your child as the devil just so you can get them the right help.

 

I am regularly in meetings where I meet a new pupil and listen to them describe their school experiences so far. More often than not, they have been very negative because of their additional needs. They have always been a square peg that people have tried to fit into the mainstream “round hole”. This has led to a miserable child who has been set up to fail by the system.

 

Children come to me with a wide range of complex needs but they are very often compounded by added anxiety. They believe there is something wrong with them and that it is wrong to be different. Having a child enter school with that kind of anxiety and negativity on top of any additional needs is a very difficult starting point. It is often a comfort to be able to tell them why they are different and that being different is ok.

Complex needs

A child with diagnosed ASD, ADHD, Conduct Disorder, Tourettes, Sensory Processing Disorder or any others will still have enormous challenges to face. The diagnosis won’t change that, but it will signpost them to services, give them and parents a little piece of mind and hopefully get them extra support down the line.

 

What if the medical professionals aren’t sure what to diagnose? Unfortunately it’s not often cut and dry. These kinds of conditions often come in different levels of severity or will be a combination of more than one. They have so many crossovers with each other that pinpointing the need may be really difficult. Then when attachment is thrown into the mix; which has many of the same traits as the others and is an absolute minefield of behaviours, it makes the diagnosis even more challenging.

 

This is the position I am finding myself in all too often, because it isn’t easy to diagnose an exact difficulty or it isn’t severe enough to be clear the child isn’t given a diagnosis. They get a complex needs label and sent to an SEMH setting. I talked in a previous blog about how my setting has moved from being a traditionally ‘naughty boys’ school and is now something completely different. We are absorbing many of these children with moderate, undiagnosed needs.

 

This is the role that we have been cast to play and I believe we do it well, but it is a massive challenge to identify what the needs of the child are with such a broad label and little guidance to go on. It is because we try not to label, treat each and every child individually and use a holistic relationship based approach that we can get past the behaviours that have become a negative side effect and find the real difficulties.

 

But sometimes we are not enough on our own. All too often, we are already playing the role of parent and teacher – we cannot be doctor and therapist as well! The therapist I listened to at the conference said that we, as teachers, know far more about the child and can offer them far more in their day to day situation than they as therapists can offer when meeting the child for an hour a week. I totally agree – but if we are being trusted with that then why is it when we flag up something that goes beyond our levels of expertise we aren’t listened to?

 

I mentioned attachment earlier and it plays an enormous role in our school. It means that children have experienced some early and ongoing trauma. Knowing that we have to work closely with parents means that we are not always the people the children can talk to and they might need someone independent. Not to mention the fact we are not trained psychologists who have done 7 years at university. We are often skilled enough to identify a need but the therapy must come from a professional.

 

Far too often we learn to work effectively with a child who doesn’t have a diagnosis; has a mixture of additional needs or significant attachment difficulties or both. We get them to year 11, through their GCSEs and a place at college only for them to then fail because the support wasn’t good enough. The college wasn’t prepared for them. Very often this is because they were back to being a square peg in a round hole for which a missing diagnosis is partly to blame.

 

We have a great track record for breaking through the behaviours that have been used to mask difficulties and identify an additional need of the child. We make progress where others have not, we have experience and knowledge and only push for support when we feel it is absolutely necessary – but just like the parent who has to fight for their child at every turn, we are constantly up against barrier after barrier.

 

So, should we put labels on children? No, I don’t think so, but if they help to get the support needed then I can live with them!

 

Do we need diagnosis and support from other agencies? Yes, for a multitude of reasons! Whatever their needs are, a child is a child and support should be there if and when it is needed. The parents and the teachers may or may not be experts in those medical fields but they are experts in that individual child and surely that should count for something. No, actually it should count for everything!

 

Graham would like to invite ideas for contributions, so if you have any SEND issues you’d like to hear from him on, why not get in touch with Axcis today? And don’t forget to register or check out our jobs pages if you’re seeking SEND work or staff!

Free resources with the Big Schools Birdwatch

It is widely recognised that getting outdoors and experiencing nature is great for children, so why not get your class involved in the Big Schools Birdwatch? It’s running now (and until 23rd Feb), so take a look at the FREE resources which have been made available by the RSPB, do something fun and help this fantastic organisation at the same time!

The Big Schools Birdwatch – what is it?

Quite simply, the Big Schools Birdwatch asks children to spend an hour identifying and counting the birds which visit their outside space. The results are then sent back to the RSPB.

What resources are available to help?

Bird identification poster

Once you register to take part, you’ll be sent a bird identification poster. You can use this to teach the children how to recognise the different birds which come to visit.

Counting Sheet

Get involved with the Big Schools Birdwatch!

To help children to keep track of which birds they have seen, and how many, download this excellent counting sheet.

Parts of a bird worksheet

Use it to prepare for your bird watch, or as an extension or homework task. This parts of a bird worksheet could be used in several different ways. Download it here.

Make a pine cone bird feeder

Sitting and counting for an hour might be challenging for some students, so this practical activity is a great idea for children who enjoy something a bit messier! Get your instruction sheet here.

Bird Matching Game

Another fun activity for your class is this lovely bird matching game. Simply print the sheets off and cut them along the dotted lines to make your own set of cards, then match away! Get your cards here.

Other resources

There are lots of other bird-based activities on the RSPB website, so why not take a look and see what else you can use to enhance your lessons?

Are you seeking teaching or support work?

Register with Axcis and become connected to a network of special and mainstream schools in your area for work.

Register with Axcis and become connected to a network of special and mainstream schools in your area for work.

If you are looking for school based work and are not already registered with Axcis, why not get in touch or register today and find out how we can assist you? We have offices nationwide and a team of expert consultants who have proven relationships with specialist and mainstream schools in your area, so if you need work, why not register now? It’s free and takes just a few minutes – what do you have to lose?

 

Introducing… Graham (Axcis Manchester)

Axcis is continuing to grow as more and more schools hear about us and start using our services. As a result, our Manchester office has a new consultant, so if you’re seeking work (or staff) in the Manchester, Stockport or Tameside areas, why not get in touch with Graham? Find out a bit more about him here.

About Graham

Graham Warner

Prior to joining Axcis, I gained six years of recruitment experience working solely in the SEND sector in Greater Manchester. This has given me an excellent understanding of the needs of SEND schools, PRUs and alternative provisions in terms of the types of staff who will be successful in their settings and the types of people who will make the most difference to their children.

 

I am also a Team Teach tutor – trained in delivering de-escalation techniques and strategies to teachers and support staff. This is something we value at Axcis and often offer courses in to our own candidates.

 

During my career in the SEND sector, I have also gained experience as a youth worker with vulnerable homeless young adults displaying SEMH difficulties. This has been in a range of settings, including a residential home, a homeless shelter and a youth centre. I also have volunteer teaching assistant experience in a mainstream primary school as well as a specialist autism school.

 

This combination of training and experience helps me to understand how important it is to invest in and provide opportunities for the most vulnerable young people in our society and not just the most able. It is important for me to feel that the work that I do has a bigger meaning and is providing a beneficial contribution to society and individuals, not just the satisfaction of doing my job well and being successful.

Would you like to work with Graham?

Graham covers the Manchester, Stockport & Tameside areas for Axcis. If you are seeking work (or staff) in those locations, then get in touch with Graham today to see how he can help. Or if you’re seeking work in any other area, register online and we will put you in touch with your personal consultant in your local office.

 

FREE Resources: Face Dominoes

Do you work with students who need to learn how to recognise how others are feeling? If so, check out this fantastic resource we found on the SEN Teacher website!

What are Face Dominoes?

Face Dominoes are a set of printable dominoes with facial expressions on each end. The aim of the game is to take turns to match up the faces by laying the cards end to end. The first one to lay all their pieces is the winner. This fun game will develop not only an awareness of how others are feeling, it will also help to develop social skills in the form of taking turns, being a gracious winner (or not a sore loser!) and discussing what the correct answers are. With careful involvement from the teacher or support worker, there are lots of opportunities for learning experiences while playing this deceptively simple game, so why not give it a go with your students?

 

face dominoes

Click here to get the game

Are you seeking teaching or support work?

Register with Axcis and become connected to a network of special and mainstream schools in your area for work.

Register with Axcis and become connected to a network of special and mainstream schools in your area for work.

If you are looking for school based work and are not already registered with Axcis, why not get in touch or register today and find out how we can assist you? We have offices nationwide and a team of expert consultants who have proven relationships with specialist and mainstream schools in your area, so if you need work, why not register now? It’s free and takes just a few minutes – what do you have to lose?

 

Axcis January Giveaway: Keyboard (SEND/VI)

The Axcis January Giveaway is to win a fantastic “SEND/VI Keyboard”. This great computer accessory would be very useful for many students with visual or motor impairments.

About this prize

  • Large (double size), clear and bright keys enable easy identification and use of the keyboard by children or anyone with special needs / impaired sight
  • All keys are colour coded to aid recognition not just of each key but of vowels, consonants, numbers and function keys with traditional UK layout (no Function keys)
  • Hygenic, splash & food resistant with antibactrial finish helps reduce bacterial growth
  • Can be connected via USB or PS2 connectors to any PC, Laptop or MAC (PS2 adaptor not supplied)
  • Plus BONUS ‘novelty’ turtle shaped mouse can make learning or play twice as fun!

 

How to enter the Axcis January Giveaway

If you’d like to be in with a chance of winning this great prize, why not enter our giveaway? all you need to do is follow THIS LINK and select how you’d like to enter. It takes just a few seconds and is entirely FREE of charge. So why not take a peek now and get yourself entered into this month’s Axcis Giveaway?

Register today and work for Axcis

If you’re not already registered with Axcis, but would like to seek a SEND teaching or support position, why not get in touch or register with Axcis today and find out how we can assist you? We have offices nationwide and a team of expert consultants who have proven relationships with specialist and mainstream schools in your area, so if you need work, why not register now?

 

Terms and Conditions are applicable to all giveaway entrants.

Merry Christmas from Axcis Education Recruitment

We hope that everyone has a very Merry Christmas – here are some festive photos to enjoy from us here at Axcis!

 

We were thrilled with our Christmas cards this year

Our Christmas cards were  made by one of the special schools we work with – thanks Highshore Students!

Andy also had fun getting involved with handmade Christmas cards!

Erin and Morgan getting into the Christmas spirit

The London team enjoyed having a go at curling!

Christmas Jumper day in our Liverpool office

The Axcis South West & Wales team getting into the Christmas spirit

 

Wishing you a very Merry Christmas from all at Axcis Education Recruitment

Are you seeking special needs teaching or support work in your area?

Do you know anyone else who might be?

Why not register, refer a friend or get in touch today to find out more?
Who knows what 2018 might bring you?

Meet the team: Axcis Liverpool

Take a sneak-peek behind the scenes of the Axcis Liverpool office and find out who the people are who work so hard to find the best SEND teachers and support staff for the schools they work with.

What areas do Axcis Liverpool cover?

Axcis Liverpool serves the following areas:

 

  • Cheshire
  • Chester
  • Chorley
  • Flintshire
  • Halton
  • Knowsley
  • Lancashire
  • Liverpool
  • Ormskirk
  • Preston
  • Sefton
  • St Helens
  • Warrington
  • Widnes
  • Wigan
  • Wirral
  • Wrexham

 

 

We also cover North Wales from our Liverpool office

 

Who works at Axcis Liverpool?

Helen Hughes, Head of Vetting, Marketing and Logistics

From left: Lyndsey, Zara, Lauren, Rebecca, Nicola, Cassie and Kim

Lyndsey Emmanuel, Senior Vetting Officer (Zara covering while Lyndsey on Maternity leave)

Lauren Griffiths, Senior Education Consultant

Nicola Jones, Education Consultant

Rebecca Donnelly, Education Consultant

Sarah Azzopardi, Vetting Officer

Jacqueline Edwards, Resourcer

Kim Bland, Senior Education Consultant

Cassie Summerton, Senior Education Consultant  (North Wales)

 

Together they make a fantastic team who are ready to help with your SEND recruitment needs.

Why work with Axcis Liverpool?

Axcis Liverpool are the foremost suppliers of SEND staff to mainstream and specialist schools in the area.  They work with a range of candidates, from TAs and Teachers to Therapists and School Leaders. The Liverpool team would love to hear from you if you are looking to recruit any temporary or permanent SEND staff, or seeking employment in this sector.

 

At Axcis, we believe in an ethical approach to recruitment. This philosophy is reflected in our stringent recruitment methods and strong school relationships as well as our charitable support and partnerships. As a company, we provide quality people for day to day cover, long-term and permanent assignments. We pride ourselves on our ability to listen to your needs and find you the right candidate, no matter how specialist your requirement. We consistently receive excellent feedback from candidates and clients alike – so don’t take our word for it – here’s what one of our Liverpool candidates had to say about working with us:

“I would like to say how glad I am that I joined Axcis . I have found everyone highly professional and always helpful . The online placement days are great as you can book days that you are able to work up to 3 months in advance , I find the system easy to use. I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend Axcis Liverpool to anyone that is looking for supply or long term work”  Gill Porter, SEN Teacher

Get in touch with Axcis Liverpool

Email the branch on liverpool@axcis.co.uk or call on 0151 448 2810. Our team would be more than happy to talk to you about how they can help.

Read an article by a Liverpool candidate

We recently invited candidates to write an article for us on their experience of working for Axcis. Read our Liverpool article here.

Refer a friend to Axcis Liverpool

If you’re not seeking work, but know someone else who would be great for a SEND teaching or support role, why not refer them to Axcis? If we find them a role, you could earn up to £250 in shopping vouchers as a thank-you, so what do you have to lose?

Where are our other offices?

If you are looking for help with recruitment outside of the Liverpool area, don’t fret! Axcis also has offices which cover most of England and Wales. Find out where your nearest office is here.

 

 

 

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Candidate of the Term Winter 2017: Winners

Who is the winner of “Axcis Candidate of the Term winter 2017”? And what did they do to go above and beyond the call of duty for the school they are working in?

Candidate of the Term - Summer Term 2017The nominees

We had lots of lovely nominations from the schools we work with. These were all published on our blog for anyone who missed them. Selecting a winner wasn’t easy, and all nominees received a certificate of appreciation for the hard work they do, but after much deliberation, winners were selected…

And the winners are…

Sergio, working for Nicola (Axcis London)

Nomination: I would like to nominate Sergio! He has been so amazing since he has joined our school. Every class he goes into he gets so much praise and he has the ability to work with all pupils in school, from early years to post 16! Sergio is consistent, always happy and personable. He has been an integral part of a class team that has seen a lot of change this year which can be very difficult for our pupils. He works hard every day and puts the pupil’s needs first. Sergio more than deserves this award!

sergio COT winner with nicola.jpg

Sergio with Nicola receiving his award

 

How Sergio felt about winning:

This is what Sergio had to say about his award:

 

First, thank you so much for your visit to School to deliver me the certificate. Honestly, none of this would have been possible without your amazing work and great support. I also have to thank the school for this opportunity to be part of their staff and to learn every day.

 

 Consultant Nicola also wanted to add:

I just wanted to say a BIG congratulations again!!!! It has been so amazing to hear about how much you are helping the students and how all the staff at the school love you so much.

Samantha, working for Kira (Axcis Midlands)

Nomination: I’d like to nominate Samantha. Extraordinary work in managing to engage every single one of her students to date…. all of whom have been out of formal education for lengthy periods, and tend to be very disaffected, with special needs. In particular, she has worked with a young person in care in Erdington and prepared him for his Functional Skills English exam. He was very anxious and refused to attend his Maths exam earlier in the week. She encouraged him to attend, accompanied him and care staff to the venue and remained on site whilst he sat the exam – the first ever for him and the first step towards taking GCSE’s.

 

Sam came to us as an ESOL teacher but her wonderful manner, enthusiasm and positivity makes her perfect for working with disaffected, hard to engage young people. In addition she is professional in completing her casework records and in her communications with other professionals. We are lucky to count her as a member of our team.

sam cot winter 2017

Kira (left) with winner Sam (right)

How Samantha felt about winning:

 

After receiving her award, Samantha sent us the following message:

 

Hi Kira, I’ve seen it! Carol’s nomination, I mean. It is wonderful isn’t it? Its so nice to be appreciated. I’d like to thank you too for keeping the relationship so positive.

 

All the best, Samantha

 

PS. I think I’ll print it out and stick it in my diary as a motivator when things get a little rough!

 

Do your Axcis staff go the extra mile?

If your Axcis contractor goes the extra mile and you’d like to nominate them for a Candidate of the Term award, don’t forget to keep an eye on our blog for when nominations open next term. Or if you’d like to hire one of our fantastic teachers or support staff, why not get in touch with your local office or email us your vacancy today?

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